Thanks but no Thanks for the Memory

September 13, 2010

We recently shopped for a new mattress and given how comfortable the memory foam European pillow top mattress was when we stretched out on it in the showroom, the sales clerk had little trouble talking us into a purchase. The first night slept on it, we were hot, and I don’t mean hot in the adult funhouse sense of the word. We tossed, we turned, we sweated, we cast off the comforter and, lying beneath nothing more than a thin, Egyptian cotton sheet, we tossed and turned and sweated some more. Either I had fast forwarded into menopause complete with night sweats and my husband was suffering from sympathetic symptoms or our new mattress was smokin’.

The next morning I did a bit of research and, lo and behold, there was something the sales clerk had not told us. Memory foam operates through heat; your body heats up the foam which, in turn, molds to your body so that there are no uncomfortable pressure points. The catch is these beds ‘sleep hot’. That could be a benefit if you live next door to Sarah Palin and have to shoo Russians out of your yard now and then, but down here in the greater Houston area it’s more of a curse.

Even if your sheets’ thread count is in the quadruple digits, they will never feel crisp and cool if you’re sleeping on memory foam. And if you like to sleep cool, you may soon find yourself cranking the ac down, down, down, while your energy bill goes up up up.

We pawned our brand new bed off on a teenage daughter who loves its vast height and comfiness. She sleeps directly under an ac supply air vent and a ceiling fan and we still have to keep the ac 2 degrees lower than we used to so that she can sleep at night. In the meantime, we dragged our old mattress out of the guestroom, flipped it over – something we had neglected to do the first ten years – found it perfectly cool (yes!) and comfortable and I now look forward to climbing into bed each night .

Thanks, but no thanks, for the memory.